Indieterria meets Sahera Walker

Sahera Walker interview

Known as the Queen of Underground Scene in London, Sahera Walker is one of the most respected independent promoters working on the DIY scene. Her passion, music knowledge and intuition have been praised on numerous occasions and were recognized by industry professionals. Indieterria is following young, successful females who are taking the music business by storm and continue to change the industry rules. We have sat down with Sahera to discuss her zine, modern alternative music and her ambitious plans to turn Cafe 1001 into a hub of music, fashion and counter-culture.

Sahera Walker

Bio: Sahera is 20 year old music journalist based in East London, and she is the creative-owner of Indie Underground Blog

She started blogging in 2016, which is when she first set up her blogging site. She has since gone on to work in PR & live music, and now owns Some Might Say Magazine, and is the lead booker for live music events at Café 1001 on Brick Lane. She runs gigs for her magazine at Nambucca in Islington & The Five Bells in New Cross.

Indie Underground & Some Might Say have received support from BBC Radio 6, Flying Vinyl, Clue Records, This Feeling, The Truman Brewery, The Zine UK, Clash Magazine, 1234 Records, Roadkill Records, ArtBeats Promo, Coda Agency, Devil PR, and more. The digital and physical platforms Sahera runs all have one aim; to promote underground DIY music, and support creatives within the industry by printing, reviewing, and featuring their work. Always keen to work with new artists, Indie Underground is a growing platform which has gained an impeccable reputation for scouting new acts who go on to be huge within the indie industry

Sahera also works as a freelance photographer & journalist, focusing solely on DIY indie rock, psych rock, grunge, and post punk music

Promoter, PR professional, zine editor, writer, journalist – it’s hard to believe that one person can do it all. Who is Sahera Walker? Please introduce yourself to the readers of our blog.

Some Might Say zine promotional picture

Sahera Walker: Very kind of you! So my name is Sahera, I’m 20 years old, and I’m a music journalist and promoter based in East London. I’m the creative owner and editor of Some Might Say Zine and Indie Underground Blog, running launch parties for each zine that comes out. I have recently taken over the Live Bookings and PR for a new DIY space on Brick Lane too!

You created “Some Might Say” zine at the age of 18. Was there any specific reason why you decided to start a musical magazine?

Sahera Walker:  I really love the DIY authenticity of rock music, and to me there’s something really special about flicking through a physical print publication, and just seeing all the beautiful photos and art pieces in print, and soaking up new musical knowledge. I really love that vibe, and I wanted to bring that authenticity back into an industry where mainstream magazines are either dying out, or turning to conventional pop music instead. I used to love NME but they sold themselves out years ago, so I suppose I wanted to create my own print publication with no sponsors or external funding, its sole aim to promote fresh upcoming new music.

So far “Some Might Say” published five issues and the sixth one will be released shortly. What can we find in the newest edition?

Sahera Walker: It will be available to purchase by the end of May/ very start of June, via somemightsay.org. This Issue has taken months to work on, as it’s taking Some Might Say down a slightly more creative and unconventional route, so I hope the wait will be worth it!

Alongside with the zine, you run a popular music blog Indie Underground focusing on rock, post punk and DIY scene. In your opinion, how important is support from blogs and magazines for up and coming artists?

Sahera Walker: To me, it’s absolutely vital. The music industry is made into the thriving and vibrant scene that it is through DIY support, from people who love music and want to work, often for free, to promote and support new music. That’s where fans of bands end up becoming journalists, photographers, promoters, and bloggers, inspiring a real love and passion into their work. This supportive DIY scene is probably the most important thing for new bands, as without them who is going to fuel the underground music scene?

Several issues of Some Might Say magazine

You have put bands such as Yonaka, Calva Louise, False Heads or most recently Black Midi on many people’s radars. What captures your attention when it comes to indie bands? How do you recognize the “next big thing”?

Sahera Walker:  I do try! I think I was very lucky, when I got into music aged about 17 it was when bands like Yonaka, The Blinders, Strange Bones, Calva Louise, and False Heads were all starting out (the last three I’ve had play Some Might Say gigs for me, which I’m very proud of!), so I just naturally saw them at small venues playing to tiny handfuls of people. For me, I like unconventional bands that are passionate and exciting, and it just has to click in a special way for me to go crazy about a band. This doesn’t happen too often, as it’s more of a feeling you get from certain bands – it’s very special though, and all the bands you mentioned are ones who really gripped and excited me when I discovered them.

Gig goers often ask what they can do to help bands, something beyond buying a tee from the merch store. Would you have any suggestions?

Sahera Walker: I think going to gigs is the most important thing, as it supports not only the bands, but also the small venues and promoters who are hosting the gigs, which is fundamental to the scene as a whole. Bands that have a strong live following as well are the ones who end up being hotly tipped by journalists, on the radio, and then eventually scouted by agents and managers, so going to gigs really helps. But even the small things like social media posts, buying merch, streaming and downloading music; it all helps, and I know they mean massive amounts to the bands.

In April 2019, you joined Cafe 1001 as their official promoter and PR. Tell us more about this place. What can it offer to the emerging bands?

Sahera Walker: So Café 1001 is a venue space in Shoreditch, just opposite Rough Trade East. We are currently undergoing a really exciting refurbishment and rebrand in the venue, which will change the name and appearance into something a lot more DIY. We’re taking the venue down a more creative, subculture-philosophy inspired route, and alongside the gigs (focusing on indie/punk/grime/grunge) we want to have a lot of new DJs playing with us too. What we’re offering bands is payed gigs, in a fantastic DIY 200 capacity space, with a state of the arts PA and backline system. I also run PR campaigns and social media campaigns for my live events, so bands would be fully supported by us.

Some Might Say logo at legendary London Club, Nambucca

You are known for coming up with groundbreaking ideas. Your newest one is to create a rotating exhibition aimed at avant-garde DIY artists, music zine makers, live music photographers and designers. Can you provide us with more information about it? How long will it last? will artists be able to sell their works?

Sahera Walker:  Given the DIY subculture philosophy we are implementing, I came up with the idea of running a rotating exhibition in the venue’s front room. We will have art work, photos (art based, film, portrait, and live music), and film reels on display, as well as zines in the venue. The idea is to have a launch night (June 27th) with live music to accompany, and this will be a chance for the creatives involved to network and sell their work. We will then keep some of the work up in the venue, and keep the zines in the café space for people to browse through during the day. Then every three months, we will run another exhibition, where we can refresh the art and photos we have, and bring in some new zines to the space

Let’s play! You are given a whole page in The Guardian for a music column. What bands are you recommending to the public?

Sahera Walker: So many, I could write you pages on this! I’d have to narrow it down to Black Country New Road, The Murder Capital, Weird Milk, Kid Kapichi, Fontaines DC, Uncle Tesco, Legss, Happy Hour, Pip Blom, False Heads, Squid, Haze, LICE, Avalanche Party, Strange Bones, Calva Louise and JW Paris. Just a quick note, when I spoke earlier about those rare special bands who I just click with – Kid Kapichi are my current obsession, and I would recommend them highly.

The last question (but very important one). If any artist or musician wants to get in touch – how can they reach you?

Sahera Walker: I have contact forms on my websites which are usually the best shout to play a gig at my new venue:
https://indieunderground.blog/play-for-us/,

Send your submissions to:
https://indieunderground.blog/contact/
https://somemightsay.org/contact/

Or any London based bands, you can usually find me at a scatty punk gig in Camden or Brixton, so feel free to come up and say hi!

You can follow Sahera on socials:
https://www.facebook.com/sahera.walker/
https://www.instagram.com/youareallslaves/
https://twitter.com/sahera_walker
https://open.spotify.com/user/1143822162
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCssXbu_GT0ZU47I8xUmXEdw

https://www.instagram.com/somemightsayzine/
https://somemightsay.org/
https://www.facebook.com/somemightsayzine/

https://indieunderground.blog/
https://www.facebook.com/indieundergroundblog/

Articles:
http://northern-exposure.co/interview-sahera-walker-some-might-say/
https://www.thezineuk.co.uk/2019-futurepicks-the-music-people-on-and-off-stage/

The new issue of “Some Might Say” will land in a couple of days so don’t forget to order your copy. Supporting local zines, magazines and independent artists is vital for the scene to survive. Indieterria will keep shining light at the people behind the music – promoters, event managers, club owners, streaming services companies, radio DJ’s and hosts, photographers, managers or music scouts – they all are working in the background helping artists move from one level of their careers to another. They are essential yet they are rarely getting any credits or thanks. Let’s bring them into limelight!

Please stay tuned as we have something special planned very soon!

XXX
R+M

Indieterria meets The Empty Page

Hello again!

Let’s start with a riddle. Do you know what Frank Zappa and John Peel have in common? They both thought that the music business became too safe and too predictable. The thrill of making something exciting, the unknown and the chance of everything going awry that characterized the music-making for generations suddenly disappeared. The stimulating and (sometimes) dangerous game turned into a polished and ironed showcase for pop princesses and boy bands. And it slowly started leaking into the rock and roll, turning rebels and their muses into fashionistas and influencers buying shoes and belts.

Luckily for us and certain old school radio DJ’s, there is always an underdog band that comes out of nowhere and rescues the day. Our musical saviours are raw, energetic and completely independent. And they come from Manchester! We have sat down with the Mancunian trio, the Empty Page, few days before their gig at the Dead Dead Good Weekend on 11th of May to discuss their beginnings (in an old and cold warehouse), having a female lead singer and their plans for a glorious future.

Official bio:

Taking their name from a Sonic Youth song which in turn was inspired by Jack Kerouac, 90s alt-punk inspired Northerners The Empty Page have been making steady headway since their inception in a draughty warehouse in Ancoats, Manchester. Following an invite from rock production royalty Gggarth Richardson (RATM, Biffy Clyro, Melvins), their debut album, ‘Unfolding’ was recorded with him in Vancouver, Canada, with tracks receiving national airplay by the likes of Steve Lamacq on 6 Music and receiving praise from the underground press. As well as diligently ticking their favourite UK venues off their collective wish list, from Manchester Ritz to Hebden Bridge Trades, the band went back to Canada to play shows in Toronto after winning Indie Week UK. Carefully selected UK shows are planned for 2019.

The Empty Page picture by A supremeshot

The Empty Page are:
Giz (guitars)
Jim (drums and vocals)
Kel (bass and vocals)

You are described as a band that combines guitar noise with Northern charm. Please introduce yourself to readers of Indieterria.

Kel: I’m Kel, I play bass and sing and write the words.
Jim: I’m Jim, I play drums and sing
Giz: And  I’m Giz and I play guitar

We have heard some incredible stories about how bands came to be. But meeting in a cold warehouse must be one of the best tales so far. What were a trio of rock musicians doing on an industrial estate on the outskirts of Manc?

Jim: A friend of ours had this weird room in a freezing cold mill in Manchester full of instruments and recording gear. Full. You couldn’t move. Anyway, we needed somewhere to rehearse and record. It really was freezing. We could barely get through a full song it was that cold so in the end we started to set fire to our gear for warmth. Shame really because those songs were brilliant but we’ll never remember them, just how cold we were. Also it was quite a cheap room! (laughing)

The Empty page started to turn heads almost immediately after its conception. Your demos “The Ancoats Sessions” were heard by producer Garth “GGGarth” Richardson who worked with The Melvins and Rage Against the Machine – and he invited the band to his studio in Canada to work on your debut album “Unfolding”. It was released in 2016. Please tell us how do you remember your collaboration with Richardson?

Jim: The guy is wonderful. He’s thoughtful, respectful, he knows everything about music yet he always listens to what you want. He’s ridiculously funny but my god his “Northern” accent is dreadful! (laughs)

Kel: It was the best time. So great to lock ourselves away in a cabin in the middle of nowhere and focus on music 24/7 while drinking lots of Canadian craft beer and listening to stories of legendary musicians which we’re not allowed to repeat. We’d love to go back and record with him again but it’s just logistics really.

In February this year, you released “When The Cloud Explodes” produced by local duo Sugar House. The album, according to your page, is inspired by Northern cities like Liverpool and Manchester. Did you plan to have your new record produced locally, as if in opposition to the first one that was created so far away from home?

Kel: No, not really. We just made a decision to try a different way of putting music out there this time. We wanted to take each song individually and release it as its own thing. I do think it made sense to record that song in a humdrum town in the North though, and it doesn’t get much more humdrum than St Helens. The recording process was very different from what we did with GGGarth, we had more time for a start. So, we came out with something sounding quite different from what we have done before. Our plan now is to release a series of individual songs over the year, produced by different people and all quite distinct from one another musically. People keep asking about an album, but for now, we’re doing things step by step. Maybe an album will come later.

Let’s talk about the excellent video to you shot for the song. It was filmed in Manchester and directed by Jason Weidner, who worked previously with Desperate Journalist and Stonehouse Jack. You have also recruited two contemporary/urban dancers named Max and Chiara. How did you convince them to star in your video? What is the message behind it?

 

Kel: Jo from Desperate Journalist suggested Jason when we were looking to shoot a video at quite short notice, to cut a long and boring back story short. We hit it off right away and got planning. We’d had an idea to include dancing somehow and had been through lots of ambitious ideas, then, in the end, we decided to keep it quite simple. Jason is extremely skilled at editing and he did a brilliant job. Max got involved through a friend of ours named Bundy who we have known for years on the punk scene as he’s drummed in lots of punk bands including The Business. Max works in Bundy’s brilliant little punk bar, The Salty Dog in Northwich, so he suggested him when I put a call out for dancers. Then we asked Max if he knew anyone else and when he suggested his girlfriend Chiara. And it seemed perfect to have them star as a young couple just hanging out. They were absolute troopers. It was a hot day as you can see and we had them dance over and over again in different locations till they pretty much collapsed on the grass in Hulme Park. But they’re young and fit and they loved it. We had such a fun day together.

The song, in a nutshell, is just about the beauty of creativity. Whether that’s writing songs, making art, poetry, knitting, dancing or whatever. It’s one of the most wonderful things we have as humans and I really think it’s a lifesaver. We didn’t want to be too literal with the video, so we thought dancing would be a nice visual expression of the joys of creative freedom.

Jim: I think we filmed the whole thing on Valentine’s Day too, so once they’d finished and got their breath back, they were straight off out for a romantic date. They probably went down the arcade or to the fair or whatever fit young dancers like to go. Stock car racing? Something like that!

We can’t stop salivating over the vinyl edition of “When The Cloud Explodes” – 7 inch, released on orange wax, limited to just 330 copies. It looks unreal. Are there any copies left and if so – where can the record be purchased? Asking for a friend…

The band photographed by A supremeshot

Kel: It’s sold out on the Rough Trade website twice now, they will be restocking soon. We have some in a few record shops like Jumbo in Leeds and others, and it will be in Piccadilly Records in Manchester very soon. We are selling it on our website (theemptypageband.com) and Bandcamp as well and we will have some for sale at upcoming gigs. It’s selling really fast though, well over half gone, so I wouldn’t hang around!

Kel, a question especially for you. You gave an extensive interview to Louder Than War in 2016. You said: “I think more women should play music, because there is still a heavy trend towards males on stage at gigs, but more importantly women should just be able to do it without having to be scrutinised so much in every way.” Has the situation improved in the last three years? Are organizations such as Safe Gigs for Women really making a difference?

Kel: (deep breath) I’ve been in bands for a really, really long time and I’ve always felt I had to work a bit harder just to be treated with respect as a musician and songwriter and not just considered a “girl singer” (like it’s some kind of gimmick) or putting up with comments about my appearance rather than the actual music. I remember many moons ago, some bloke actually saying to me that they were thinking of “getting a girl singer” for their band as it was a good thing image-wise. I was furious then in my teens and I am as furious now at that attitude. There have always been women in guitar bands but I think there have been more women getting involved and getting a platform in the past few years. This has been the result of a lot of different factors including the issues relating to inequality in this industry (and in general) being openly talked about more. Women haven’t always been as welcomed, celebrated and treated as equally as they are now in the UK music scene but I think we still have a way to go and it’s complicated.

One thing that has helped is more promoters putting together representative bills. Women don’t need to be sidelined into only playing “female only” band nights. Don’t get me wrong. There are people doing that well and for the right reasons in the name of shifting the balance and being representative, and crucially this is usually done in an inter-sectional way. Power to those people. But there are others (yes, often if not always blokes) still doing that in an awful, gimmicky, frankly pervy way. Like “check out these chicks with guitars, pfwoooarr”. As a woman,  you have to be careful about which gigs you say yes to. I have been caught out in the past where the gig has seemed like a normal booking and then nearer the time, it has turned out to be something else. You have to be quite vigilant, which is really annoying when you just want to play. But there are lots of bills now that are just generally more representative. I like playing with a mix of bands that are similar to us musically and I like it even better if there is an intersectional representation of humans on that bill. Nobody likes to be tokenised.

Safe Gigs For Women are doing great things for audience safety and it’s essential that women and non-cis males who attend shows are not made to feel threatened or treated disrespectfully. These are slightly different but related issues. It’s all part of an ongoing fight and we also have to remember that this is not just a fight here in the UK but around the world. Feminism is worthless if it does not aim to make things fairer for all women all over the world. There is a long way to go.

You jokingly say that you are on world tour of Yorkshire this year, but you have scoped some amazing gig opportunities. You supported Desperate Journalist in March at The Deaf Institute and in May you will share the stage with The Wildhearts in Scarborough. You will also make an appearance at Dead Dead Good Weekend in Manchester and at Camden Rocks in London. What can be expected from your live shows?

Jim: A fucking good show. We throw everything we have into them. We have fun!

You have hinted on your social media that the coming months will be very busy for the band. What can we expect in the nearest future?

Kel: (laughing) More shows and more releases! Our next single, “He’s Very Good At Swimming” is coming out on June 28th accompanied by a video by Debbie Ellis/asupremeshot. It’s a song with an important subject: victim blaming, and the way the media (and arguably the justice system) foregrounds the academic and sporting achievements of the accused and picks apart every aspect of the victim’s life and lifestyle when writing about rape cases almost all the time.

Last question – you can steal one record made by a band that inspired you. Whose work is so good you’d claim it as your own?

Jim: For me it would be “The Holy Bible” by Manic Street Preachers
Kel: Yes, that and Fontaines DC  – “Dogrel”

You can follow the band at their socials:
https://theemptypageband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thmptypg/
https://twitter.com/thmptypg
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRvo9IV6VKi6HRdzJRXwawA

The Empty Page will be touring a lot this summer and we can expect a lot of dates to be added to their calendar. Outside for the Dead Dead Good Weekend in Northwich, the band is booked to play Leeds on the 18th of May at CHUNK and Camden Rocks Festival in London in June. Catch them for an unforgettable lesson in independent rock and rolling. With a huge dose of unspoiled, unfiltered fun.

See you soon!
xoxxo
R+M

Indieterria meets Owen Meikle- Williams

Dear Readers,

Following our interview with record producer extraordinaire Gavin Monaghan, we continue to shine a light on people who set up high standards in the music business. Our next guest is event management student and artist manager based in Manchester – Owen Meikle – Williams. Forget everything you read about millennials spending fortunes on avocado toasts and being offended by everything. The younger generation is actually very active and does much more than we seem to notice. Hands up all you thirty-somethings who organised a full scale festival in the heart of Northern Quarter on your first year at the university. Or anyone who taught themselves music management to help others put first steps in the business. It is easy to see why Owen is making waves in Manchester. Even in the town that is used to doing things differently he is seen as a breath of fresh air. We sat down with Owen ahead of After All festival he founded to talk about event organising, the bands he manages and who he would book for his dream festival.

Festival banner

You are the main force behind After All Festival – that will take place in Manchester  on 19th May 2019. Please introduce yourself to the readers of Indieterria.

Owen Meikle-Williams: Hi everyone. I’m Owen Meikle-Williams, and I’m a first year student at BIMM University in Manchester. Live music is my absolute passion, and I’m studying event management. After All Festival on May 19th isn’t actually part of my course  but I thought I would put on a local event to showcase some fantastic bands, and raise some money for charity along the way. I’ve gone for May 19th to be as close to the 22nd as possible – “After All that has happened, let music bring us together…”

It is quite a task to organize one gig, less alone a whole festival. Can you tell us how the idea started and how long was this event in the planning?

Owen Meikle-Williams: Well, I’ve been going to gigs since I was 5 years old, so I guess this has been a few years in the planning! More seriously, I put on my first gig just over a year ago, reintroducing live music to The Briton’s Protection for the first time in many years. That gave me the bug, and the idea for After All came from then really. Serious planning started about 6 months ago, lining up venues and finding the right bands.

After All will incorporate concerts across three iconic Manchester venues: Night & Day Café, AATMA and The Castle Hotel – all less than three minutes of walk from each other.  We absolutely love it as this eliminates the hassle of commuting  between places. But shall we expect clashes between acts?

Owen Meikle-Williams: I’ve tried to mix things up a bit across the stages so minimise this, but with so many great bands on the line-up, there are bound to be a few tough choices to make. Better to have that problem I think than looking at a line-up and not seeing anything you want to watch!

You managed  to gather a jaw dropping line up: from rising Mancunian band Narcissus to visiting guests such as Birmingham based The Pagans S.O.H  We shouldn’t be saying it – but we are impressed.  Is this the final line up or do you still have some aces up your sleeve?

Owen Meikle-Williams:  Never say never…but the line up is quite full as it is at the moment.

The Festival plans to donate all profits to charity. Can you tell us more about the organisations you will support?

Owen Meikle-Williams:  We are raising money for two music related charities, both of which in turn support larger charities. Musicians Against Homeless (MAH) is a great cause, and you can’t walk around Manchester at the moment without seeing what a vital need this is. The money raised by MAH goes to support Crisis.

Walter’s Page raises money for Make a Wish, helping kids with serious illnesses get some much needed joy. If you have not come across Walters Page, I seriously suggest you check out their Facebook page. Follow the antics of Walter and Eustace, literally a pair of muppets, as they turn up on stage, off stage and in the bar with some of the best known bands on the planet.

You work with BIMM on this festival. Do you think, it is the possibility of having regional editions of After All for example in Bristol or  Birmingham  also in association with BIMM in the future?

Owen Meikle-Williams: That would be fantastic, but I’m really focused on making this year a success first. If things go well, and it is looking good at the moment, then I’ll look to try and re-run the festival next year. I’m always up for a challenge though, so maybe a multi-site one could be doable.

Owen Meikle-Williams – the man behind Manchester new indie music festival

Besides being the festival organiser you also manage local artists. We would love to hear more about them.

Owen Meikle-Williams: I prefer “working with” to “managing”! I am working with a couple of up and coming singer songwriters at the moment, including Leah Karis who is playing After All festival on May 19th. It’s early days, but I’m really keen on championing local talent where I can.

Last question:  we know it is a bit too early for this – but if all goes well, would you consider to bring the festival in 2020 and if so, who would you want to headline. You have got 5 picks and unlimited budget.

Owen Meikle-Williams:  James – my all time favourite band and Manchester music Royalty.

The Slow Readers Club – now finally seem to making it big and getting the success they deserve.

The Blinders – so exciting live – I can’t wait to see how far these guys go.

Editors – so good live, and criminally underrated in the UK. I had the pleasure of seeing them in Berlin and Hamburg last year, and it is amazing to see how well mainland European audiences react to them

Andy Burrows – drummer from Razorlight, now a solo singer, I think that his type of music would perfectly suit the acoustic stage at this festival.

You can follow Owen Meikle -Williams on social media:

https://www.facebook.com/owen.meiklewilliams
https://www.facebook.com/OMWManager/
https://www.facebook.com/OfficialAfterAllFestival/
https://twitter.com/AfterAllFestiv1
https://www.instagram.com/after_all_festival/

On May 19th 2019,  eighteen acts will play across the tree established stages in Manchester to raise the funds for charity. You can find more information about the festival on their official Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/events/363074884283149/

Advance tickets are between £10- £12 and they will cost £15 on the day. Doors open at 17:30 PM

To avoid disappointment – please book your tickets online at:

https://www.skiddle.com/whats-on/Manchester/Night-And-Day-Cafe/After-All-Festival/13500619

Vanadian Avenue will be at After All Festival making noise and hanging out with the best people in Mancunia.  We are hoping to see some of you down the front.

M/R

Indieteria introduce The Festival Season

Dear artists!

Ever year, around November, applications for summer festivals are being opened and we receive a lot of questions regarding them. Where can we find them? How to look for them?  How long are they open? – are the most common questions. We work with a large group of unsigned and signed artists and we inform them about each opportunity as they arrive. But keeping an eye out and a hand on the pulse can be very hard when you are juggling daily work, music career and family life. This post has been months in the making. We were debating how to make it easier for unsigned bands to apply for festivals and in the beginning, we we were posting links on our Facebook Page.

Few days ago, Malicia had an eureka moment and we decided to gather all links into one big database and post it on our blog.

So here there are! Go crazy and apply to as many as you want – just note that they might close at any moment! Be quick, or be late!

UK Festivals (aka Domestic)

TRUCK FESTIVAL
26-28 July 2019, Oxfordshire
https://truckfestival.com/contact/band-app/

Blackthorn Music Festival
19 – 21 July 2019, Stockport
http://www.blackthornmusicfestival.co.uk/apply

Isle of Wight Festival
13-16 July 2019, Newport, Isle of Wight
New Blood competition is organised by London Based agency Hot Vox
https://hotvox.co.uk/isle-wight-festival
Application:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc9rMAhdsT6uD-hrgnglcfd3_o-h1S_DKvm_AobYfu1-Xyzqw/viewform

Boardmasters Festival
7 – 11 August 2019, Newquay
https://marcatoapp.com/forms/19-boardmasters/applytoplayboardmasters19

Electric Fields Festival
4-6 July 2019, Drumlanrig Castle, Thornhill
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfVJaaobAy_pByBQ6HOWmsKzcSXgF1AALdszfCT1aPoVLWtGA/viewform

Merthyr Rising
24- 26 May 2019, Merthyr Tydfil, Wales
http://www.merthyrrising.uk/news_post/rising-rebels-2019
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeGXqGdfvR62jwEPinYyeyXPhlTQaqyEuzqsfOMzhAVufo6ag/viewform

Camden Rocks Festival
1-2 June 2019, London
https://camdenrocksfestival.com/band-submission/

Nozstock The Hidden Valley
18-21 July, Bromyard
https://applications.eventree.co.uk/apply/index/id/1164

Green Man Festival
15 – 18 August 2019, Crickhowell
Send a Soundcloud link to artists@greenman.net
Or use this link below: https://www.greenman.net/rising/

Live at Leeds – 4 May 2019, Leeds
Slam Dunk Festival – 25 May 2019, Leeds – both festivals belong to Future Sounds Group
Music Submissions: sally@futuresoundgroup.com
Live in Leeds: https://www.musicglue.com/live-at-leeds-2019/

110 Above Festival
2-4 August, Gopsall Hall Farm, Leicestershire
Artist applications: Artists@110above.com
https://www.110above.com/information

2000 Trees Festival
11 – 13 July 2019, Upcote Farm, Withington
https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/2000treesBandApp

Nibley Festival
5 -6 July 2019, North Nibley Cotswolds
https://nibleyfestival.co.uk/info/band-contact/

HoyFest
4 October 2019, Cardiff, Wales
https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=DQSIkWdsW0yxEjajBLZtrQAAAAAAAAAAAAZAAOQHyZtUNElLREg5S1FPRldBUTMwUEFNM05EUzNDWC4u

Hanwell Hootie
11 May 2019 London
https://www.musicglue.com/hanwell-hootie-2019/

Victorius Festival
23-25 August Southsea, Portsmouth
https://www.victoriousfestival.co.uk/contacts/

Cornbury Festival
5 -7 July 2019, The Great Tew Park, Oxfordshire
https://www.cornburyfestival.com/contact-us
Apply to Play
Send your short clip or link to mail@cornburyfestival.com

Farm Festival
25 – 27 July 2019, Somerset
http://farmfestival.co.uk/bands-and-djs/
Send your music to  music@farmfestival.co.uk

Standon Calling
25-27 July 2019, Standon, Hertfordshire
Application will open soon:
https://standon-calling.com/get-involved/band-submissions/

Are You Listening? Festival
27 April 2019, Reading
http://areyoulistening.org.uk/tickets
Bands interested in playing at the festival, please email the organizers at dave@heavypop.co.uk and include a link to your music and a paragraph of background info.

XPO North
3-4 July 2019, Iverness, Scotland
https://xponorth.co.uk/submissions/music/

Bushstock 
15 June 2019, London, Shepherd’s Bush
https://www.bushstock.co.uk/apply-to-play

Live in Chester
4-7 July 2019, Chester
https://www.musicglue.com/chester-live-2019/apply-to-play

Black Deer Festival (Americana and Country/Blues)
21 – 23 June 2019 Eridge Park, Kent 
https://blackdeerfestival.com/news/play-at-black-deer/

Tiree Music Festival
12-14 July, Tiree Island, Scotland
https://tireemusicfestival.co.uk/artist-submissions/

BrainChild Festival
12-14 July 2019, East Sussex
Applications close on 15th of March so please hurry up!
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScV0oA54dH68Ucv8t-OD4lt9LF0xAIKRLPGXgtqAy9rIyguww/viewform

The Long Road Festival
6-8 September 2019, Stanford Hall Leicestershire (Americana and Roots)
https://www.thelongroad.com/news/artist-registration-long-road-2019-now-open/

Festivals Abroad (aka Away)

If your band is looking to travel outside of the UK or move to the next level of their career, participating in an international gigs is a no brainer.  We receive a lot of questions how to book a show in the EU or even in the USA, and there is no straight answer to this question. The best way is always to hire a professional booker, but those companies can ask for 20%-30% of your earnings per gig to cover their costs. Some bands book their own shows by contacting venues or local promoters in each country and sort out their own travels and housing arrangements. This can be costly and we do not recommend sleeping in your vans. This 1980’s approach may be working in certain cases but is draining and can be destructive. With AirBnB and hotel deals easily available on your mobile phones, it is much wiser to book the tour properly. But we digress. There is also another way, maybe a bit trickier and not as successful but you can look for open applications online. There are plenty out there and they do work as many DIY artists we spoke to booked their performances this way. Some applications can be paid (around £15-20), but the amounts are tiny when compared to what can be gained. A festival slot for a price of two burgers and a soda? Bargain!

The hardest part is always the beginning – musicians do not know where to go. We recommend speaking to your friends and networking with other bands, promoters or record labels. If you have nobody to help you, check the social media pages of artists that inspire you and find out where they will play that season or where they go on tour. Write down each venue, festival or event along with the dates and visit their official websites. Look for Contact, Apply, Submission or FAQ sections to find out if they offer open applications. You can also email the organisers or give them a call. Check social media for each event, applications are  also advertised on Facebook or on Twitter. Sign up for newsletters so you don’t miss deadlines or important news.

Some very useful pages that will help you to start looking:

We have made it a bit easier for you and  below you will find some of the current openings. But please hurry up, the applications stay open for short period of time and if you are late, then you will have to wait a full year to apply again.

SeaSessions Festival 
21-23 of June 2019, Donegal Ireland
Artists/Bands looking to play – bands@seasessions.com
https://seasessions.com/contact/


Rise Festival
14 – 21 December 2019, Les 2 Alps Resort, France
Contact email for artists: hello@risefestival.co.uk

Hopscotch Music Fest
5-7 September 2019 Raleigh North Carolina, US
Applications for artists:
https://podio.com/webforms/22266458/1564667

Live At Heart
4 – 7 September 2019, Orebro Sweden
Application: http://liveatheart.se/applications/

Sweden Rock (application for 2020)
Sölvesborg, Sweden
https://www.swedenrock.com/en/festival/artists/band-applications-2020

Joshua Tree Music Festival
The Joshua Tree Lake Campground, Joshua Tree, CA, US
Artists can apply for three annual festivals at the site here:
https://www.joshuatreemusicfestival.com/artists
or file application at
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1F715iwSjmCTioym1-QhYN3yGl1yMwTvzrR8Qw5m2UCw/viewform?edit_requested=true

Reeperbahn Festival
 
18-21 September 2019, Hamburg, Germany
https://www.reeperbahnfestival.com/en/info/band-application
https://www.reeperbahnfestival.com/en/reeperbahnfestival/band-application/band-application

Enjoy the links and hopefully the summer festival season will be kind to you.
Best  wishes,
R+M

Bromyard Speed Festival

Hello, hello!

Ready, steady, Go!

Ready. Steady. Go!

West Midland life can be hard if you are an outgoing person without a car. Herefordshire and Worcestershire are sparsely populated and you need your own transport to get to many interesting places. Birmingham has an excellent public transport system but the further you are based from Birmingham, the worse it gets. At Vanadian Avenue, we are constantly keeping our eyes and ears open in search for some local things to do, yet we are not able to get to all events, just because there is no decent bus connection. Luckily, sometimes we can get a lift and we enjoy a fantastic day out.

Map of the event

Map of the event

Leaflet #1

Leaflet #1

Leaflet #2

Leaflet #2

Old photos always get Malicia`s attention

Old photos always get Malicia`s attention

We learnt about Bromyard Speed Festival by accident. An unconfirmed internet rumor that Jeremy Clarkson has been booked to open the first edition spread quickly like Californian forest fire causing great excitement among locals. We were a bit skeptical as he is currently filming the equivalent of “Top Gear” for Amazon Prime, but tempted to see him in real life, we decided to give it a go.

The event was to take place on Sunday, 3rd of April so exactly at 11:00 am, we arrived in Bromyard and we set ourselves up on the main street waiting for the vintage car show to start.

Car parade in full swing!

Car parade in full swing!

Rare, precious and still kicking!

Rare, precious and still kicking!

You could buy some curios trinkets at the festival

You could buy some curios trinkets at the festival

For those of you who know very little about Bromyard, we need to say few words about it. It is a medieval market town located in Herefordshire, placed exactly halfway between Hereford (22 miles) and Worcester (20 miles). According to Bromyard and Winslow Parish Council statistics, it has nearly 4,500 inhabitants, several pubs (including two traditional half-timber “black and white” buildings), one local library, one theatre (The Conquest Theatre) small S-F Museum, two hotels and St. Peter’s Church dating back to Norman times. Bromyard may seem like a quiet place but it has several very active clubs and societies organizing nationally known events such as Bromyard Gala, Nozstock Festival of Performing Arts or Folk Festival among others. It also has a strong claim to motoring fame – Morgan Cars were originally set up in Bromyard before moving to Malvern and The Chairmen of the Austin, Bean and Morgan motor companies lived inside or close to town for many years. You can learn more about Bromyard motoring history on festival’s official website: http://www.bromyardspeedfestival.co.uk/history.html

We want this car, like now!

We want this car, like now!

Preparation for the car parade

Preparation for the car parade

Car parade is about to begin

Car parade is about to begin

By 11 o’clock, the town was already packed and several vintage cars were driving through the town centre forming a small parade. At first, we thought that we have missed the formal opening and Jeremy Clarkson’s speech but soon we found out that that Mr Clarkson’s appearance was not confirmed at all and it was probably an April 1st joke, a clever publicity stunt or a local gossip. To be very honest, the entire event was very well organized and there was no need for any special guests. Rita is not a big fan of the pompous presenter so she wasn’t bother by the fact he wasn’t there. At least nobody got beaten up when the food stand ran out of burgers around midday!

General view of the festival

General view of the festival

Rows and rows of truly unique vehicles

Rows and rows of truly unique vehicles

We love antiques. Hand on the heart. One of these days we will do a blog from Antiques Roadshow!

We love antiques. Hand on the heart. One of these days we will do a blog from Antiques Roadshow!

First editions of any events are usually plagued with many unfortunate incidents so Speed Festival organizers should be praised for a nearly flawless delivery. Each point of interest has been clearly marked on maps, volunteers were helpful and well informed and guests were directed to the right places. The organizers took serious security measures and the visitors were separated from the car parade by proper fencing. We had 3 emergency ambulances points, West Mercia police stand in Co-op car park and two emergency vehicle access points. The only thing we could complain about was the prices. Although the event was generally admission free, you had to pay 3 pounds to access The Paddock situated by The Conquest Theatre and another 3 pounds for the flyers or the event plan. We didn’t mind paying for the access to Paddocks as we had a chance to see the famous Blue Bird, but paying the same amount of money for a single leaflet seems a bit too much. Other than that – we are truly impressed. Overall, the Bromyard Festival of Speed attracted more than 3000 people, so hopefully it will become another annual attraction for the picturesque town.

Festival menu

Festival menu

Memorabilia corner

Memorabilia corner

Festivals as such always bring sellers who offer many artifacts from the good old days

Festivals as such always bring sellers who offer many artifacts from the good old days

If Mal wanted to buy every old photograph she fancies, she`d have to live at Tate Gallery...

If Mal wanted to buy every old photograph she fancied, she`d have to live at Tate Gallery…

Talking about the car parade – it was a very impressive sight. More than 130 vintage and classic cars took part in it, driving slowly in circles from Rowberry Road, passing the Council Corner, turning into The Cut then into the Broad Street, and finally arriving on High Street and Rowberry Road again. The cars were touring in groups of 20-30 cars at 20 minutes intervals. You could see the very impressive Royce-Royce Bentley MK VI Special (produced between 1946 and 1952) limousines in motion carrying up to 5 people, a lot of classic Morgan cars (Plus 4 Coupe from 1954, Morgan Super Sports from 1933 or Family 3 Wheeler from 1935), superb vintage cars (previously unknown to us SunBeams, Diatto Targa Florio, Riley Brooklands and Railton Straight Eight) or fan favourites Hill Climb Cars (including Porsche Cayman SV-R, Caterham Seven or Jensen Healey). Hillclimbing motorsport is a fascinating thing and maybe one day we will write more about it. You can read a short description about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillclimbing

Caterham

Caterham

Jensen Healey

Jensen Healey

Younger visitors were also mesmerized by a large collection of classic racing bikes and rally cars. We have to say, we are not interested in motoring or racing cars but some models were simply stunning. It was hard not to fall in love with them. Rita was especially pleased to spot a classic Ferrari and Mal was happy to discover that one of the vintage cars took part in The Mdina Grand Prix Classic Car Event in 2015.

Turner GT

Turner GT

Mdina Grand Prix 2015!

Mdina Grand Prix 2015!

We have mentioned the Blue Bird above but it needs to be explained why this car was the biggest attraction of the festival. We have never heard of the Blue Bird before but it has a fantastic history worth of a blockbuster movie. It was designed by brilliant French automobile engineer Louis Hervé Coatalen in 1920 for Sunbeam, a marque registered by John Marston Co. Ltd of Wolverhampton. It was officially known as Sunbeam 350HP and was equipped with a modified aero engine. Considered to be the fastest car in the world, it was tested by famous aviation pioneer and pilot, Harry Hawker. In 1922, it was purchased by Sir Malcolm Campbell, who had it repainted blue and nicknamed it the “Blue Bird”. The rest, as they say is history. The Blue Bird won several land speeding records and Sir Campbell became a true motor racing legend. The car has been recently renovated and is visiting motoring festivals all over the country. It is also on permanent display in the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu, Hampshire. If you’d like to support the restoration of this fantastic machine, please see the links below. The museum needs to collect nearly £30,000 for a new gear box.

The legendary Blue Bird

The legendary Blue Bird

Look at the engine. It used to power the fastest car on the planet.

Look at the engine. It used to power the fastest car on the planet.

The Blue Bird links:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunbeam_350HP
https://www.beaulieu.co.uk/news/the-sunbeam-350hp-appeal/
http://www.bluebird-electric.net/bluebird_history/sunbeam_blue_bird_Malcolm_Campbell.htm

National Motor Museum links:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Motor_Museum,_Beaulieu
www.beaulieu.co.uk/
http://www.nationalmotormuseum.org.uk/

It would be very unfair, if we missed another very old and very unique Sunbeam model that was displayed right next to the Blue Bird. The other Sunbeam known professionally as Sunbeam 16/20 Sports is even older as it has been made in 1911 and is in private hands (owned by Hicky Hickling). This 4 cylinder, 4300cc vintage monster of a racing machine can go at 100 m/h at the top of its speed and is the oldest surviving competition Sunbeam in the world. The car has won numerous racing competitions and held hill record at the Shelsley Walsh racing in 1912, the oldest motorsport events in the world running continuously from 1905 until today. Restored in mid-1990, it also travels around the UK being admired by new generations of speed racing fans.

Sunbeam 16/20 Sports profile

Sunbeam 16/20 Sports profile

Sunbeam 16/20 Sports from side

Sunbeam 16/20 Sports from side

Photo of Shelsley Walsh racing course

Photo of Shelsley Walsh racing course

Sunbeam logo

Sunbeam logo

The history of Sunbeam

The history of Sunbeam

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelsley_Walsh_Speed_Hill_Climb
http://www.skwimages.com/media/802fbcec-236c-11e3-aae3-371ff1c67724-hicky-hickling-in-the-sunbeam-16-20-4-3-litre-1911-kop-hil
http://www.autocar.co.uk/blogs/motorsport/shelsley-walsh-relives-its-rich-history

We would love to write about each car or motorbike we have seen but it is simply impossible. Please take a look at our pictures and if we are missing any vital information about any of the models, please contact us and we will try to add them. Thank you kindly for your assistance!

Bromyard Festival of Speed:

Points of interest:

  • The Paddocks – located near the Conquest Theatre. Large vintage car display including the Blue Bird and Sunbeam 16/20 Sports
  • Prestige Car Display – located near the Old Road
  • Autojumble and Trade Stands – located near Sheep Close and on Pump Street
  • Motorcycle display – two locations, first one close to “Rose and Lion” pub near Little Hereford Pub and second on New Road.
  • Morgan Display – located near The Cut

Official website: http://www.bromyardspeedfestival.co.uk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BromyardSpeedFestival
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BromyardSpeed
Email: enquiries@bromyardspeedfestival.co.uk
Phone:  01885 555010
Post: Bromyard Speed Festival, c/o Holden Vintage and Classic Ltd, Linton Trading Estate, Bromyard, Herefordshire, HR7 4QT

Another of great cars - Bristol

Another of great cars – Bristol

Festival hosted a large collection of motorcycles as well

Festival hosted a large collection of motorcycles as well

Local news:

BBC News: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hereford-worcester-35953755
Hereford Times: http://www.herefordtimes.com/news/14401961.Crowds_flock_to_Bromyard_Speed_Festival/ http://www.herefordtimes.com/sport/14306797.New_motoring_event_to_take_place_in_Bromyard/
Classic Cars for Sale: http://www.classiccarsforsale.co.uk/news/event-news/1603/blue-bird-to-appear-at-bromyard-speed-festival/
Bromyard Info: http://www.bromyard.info/index.php/78-news/1716-bromyard-speed-festival-to-take-place-on-april-3.html

As usual, thank you kindly for reading and we hopefully will see you very, very soon!

Have a lovely day,
Rita and Malicia Dabrowicz