Indieterria presents North Central Music and A Northern Underground

Dear Readers,

Aren’t you tired of the same songs and voices on the radio? Yes, us too.  So, we will tell you a secret – there is life outside the Top 40. The indie underground music is currently going though incredible renaissance – not only with bands and artists having something new to say – lyrically and musically. Promoters, managers and other industry professionals are trying new things, bringing new gigs and start projects that will soon revolutionise the music scene.

Sed Seddon is one of those industry professionals, who work tirelessly behind the stages and without much fanfare – but the bands he champions and  the events he puts out can be summarised as trailblazing.  We sat down with Sed to speak about his work ahead of massive two day weekender in Liverpool and Manchester he organised called A Northern Underground that will take place on 16th and 17th November.

North Central Music logo

You act as a booker, artist manager, industry influencer – please introduce yourself to readers of Indieterria?

Sed Seddon: Hi I’m Sed! I’ve played bass in bands for a long time and founded artist management company early this year.  It`s what I love more than playing to be honest.  I’ve been involved in lots of scenes in different places and different genres – from Wigan, Manchester, Bolton, Liverpool to London. I started out in heavy metal for about 20 years and now I found this beautiful underground scene that makes me feel like a kid in a candy shop – discovering new bands consistently. More recently, I found The Novus, Kid Kapitchi and of course my new favourite band of all time – Avalanche Party who I adore.

As you mentioned you have been involved in music business for ages. Looking back at the time spent working in the industry – what skills are helpful in the hardest business on earth?

Sed Seddon:  Wouldn’t say “I work” as yet, because I’m still looking to make enough money to live off doing it. But “I`m involved” for sure. Hard industry is probably the biggest understatement one will ever say to me personally. It’s beyond anything for someone from the streets of Wigan with zero support. I’ve lost count of the amount of failed attempts at it in whatever form in this industry. Skill that you need to learn is to recognise change when it’s happening. Be it playing in a band, working for a band, organising events or more importantly when a scene is changing. Play your cards close but the biggest rule is DON`T BE A DICK. It costs nothing to be nice and I don’t care who you are. Never stop learning , soak up opportunity and take it in your stride. When you get knocked down, get up, brush yourself off and start again and repeat for as long as it takes (laughs)

Dirty Circus signing to North Central Music

Tell us about the company you have founded – North Central Music – it specialises in artists management and live events. Who is on your roster and do you look for acts to represent?

Sed Seddon: North Central Music has been an idea for a good while, couple of years maybe. The name only came this year, the company was launched in May/ June after a brilliant Sound City Music Business Entrepreneur course in Liverpool that ran for 10 weeks. The course finished a week before Sound City event so got the logo designed and cards printed up that week and I went on the network hunt which went very well (cheers Joe for putting up with the late video calls trying sort everything last minute).

North Central Music is growing. We have the excellent Fay Toulios on board dealing with our socials who’s amazing and taking everything in her stride.

The point of North Central Music is connection and calibration with our southern friends. In January this year, I had a meeting with two southern friends (even though one of them is actually Mancunian) about partnering up but it went to stale-mate as I didn’t have the full idea of what NCM was going to represent or become at that time. Something else to be learned in this business is the rule is if things works out then go with it, if they don’t – then drop it.

Dirty Circus are NCM first signing to the management roster and they are from Wigan. Like a lot of good bands they had a tough ride a few years ago but they have now returned to the game. The new music is brilliant. Love them boys, we go back years. It’s mad how it came about. Dirty Circus is influenced by Madchester movement, electronic indie vibes with new age punk thrown into the mix for a good measure. Can`t wait to get proper stuck in as it’s only just began really! The plan is to grow around a band a year. I find it pointless having 15 favourite bands on the record – I’m bringing it all together as I go. You need to adapt as a company and I am constantly adapting at the moment, so everything fits into place. But just think how things will look in 3-4 years from now as there’s loads going on behind the scenes.

What is your outlook on the indie circuit at the moment? Any particular scenes and bands that caught your ear?

Sed Seddon: Each part of the country offers something slightly different but as it is in the North, the London scene really is booming. They even have separate  scenes in different parts of London! Just think – it`s actually a scene within a scene!?? I go to London a few times a year but not fully gripped there scene as yet.

But all the new music from around the UK fits underneath this perfect umbrella of “new wave of British punk” and I think we are on the cusp of an amazing movement, everything what’s happening now is the beginning of what’s to come. Rage Against The Machine are now back together  too what’s just adding fuel to the fire. But I think all music genres and punk is crossing over. Electronic punk Fat White Family are a band I’ve only seen once very recently but like Dirty Circus or Tea Street Band they are cross over bands, as are Working Men’s Club. Then you’ve your hardcore Strange Bones, Kid Kapitchi and False Heads. Crows and The Murder Capital are more metal or doom sounding. We also have this commercial sounding punk like Idles, Shame and Heavy Lungs. Avalanche Party, The Novus or The Blinders go along the lines of cult /goth . It’s just huge there’s so many criss -crosses of genres – all representing the exact same thing and it’s all bubbling under the ground…it’s very special.

Another project you have been heavily involved is A Northern Underground. It is a mammoth two day weekender happening in Manchester and Liverpool on 16-17 November 2019. How did that come about?

Sed Seddon:  The event came about completely by accident. I was trying to grow North Central Music on the live front so I spoke to southern friends and fellow promoters at Live Circuit about putting a tour together. They book two dates and send two southern bands and I’ll do the same.

So Saturday (16th November) and Sunday (17th November) are the Northern dates and I thought I’ll make both dates both all dayers to push the boat out. I said to myself “Hmmm Let’s get a good big headliner!”

To make it happen, I chased many agents but it was all too soon . So I asked friends in Rival Bones if they fancied both dates. Then just tied all together with some great poster art (thanks Evercloud). Everything came together in about 3 weeks.

Stage times at Liverpool and Manchester gigs

You basically created a two day festival with incredible line up. Each day will have around ten acts. Let`s start with the Liverpool date. Who will be on the stage and where is the event happening?

Sed Seddon:  Liverpool event happens at The Jaracanda. Some bands such as Idealistics, Rival Bones, Manalishi, Brain Ape and Dutch Mustard are all playing both dates. It made sense as they all fit under the neu grunge wave that’s also bubbling underground around the UK. Idealistcs are from Cambridge – we asked them to join the show quite late after we had had spoken to Ali Hirsz (bassist and front woman) on the phone about her band being refused shows because Ali has a rare condition Ehlers Danlos Syndrome meaning she needs tubes that are on display to feed her heart with minerals and promoters don’t like it basically. This goes against all the NCM ethos and to be honest it completely broke me. Ridiculous situation. Thanks to people for pointing this out to us in the first place. All money raised from this event is going directly to charity EDS Trust to help raise awareness. My mum as well as other promoters has worked for charity for years so it’s nice to follow their footsteps too.

Other bands on the bill are Persian Hugs and Elevant – I`ve seen them at Sound City this year and  I loved them. Mr Ted are on board Society Of Loosers Records – that’s a hardcore label in Liverpool and they are worth huge recommendation. Lastly, I`ve seen Vulture Cult support Rival Bones last year so they were a definitely good fit for the weekender.

For those who want to come to the Manchester date – what do you have in store?

Sed Seddon:  In Manchester we overtake AATMA. Square Wild, Idealistcs and Dutch Mustard are the only bands on the bill fronted by women. Next year we will aim around the 50/50 mark as again the bands with front women are really coming through the ranks. Dutch Mustard are probably one of my latest favourites along with False Advertising and The Mysterines. They are amazing live and can’t wait to see them on Northern Territory so come down and see how they play.

Slow Hand Clap fit under the “three piece band neu grunge” umbrella but these boys add something a little different and don’t just sound like Nirvana. I’ve seen Careering the other month – they are Manchester’s answer to At The Drive In.

The Kecks and Refuge Island are travelling bands. Refuge Island come from Scotland and The Kecks are from Germany. Seen these men few months ago and we stayed friends. Great lads!

Beside promoting new and emerging artists, A Northern Underground aims to raise funds for charity. Please tell us more about the charity you will be supporting.

Sed Seddon:  So the charity is called Ehlers-Danlos Support UK, something I’ve never heard of until chatting to Ali Hirsz of Idealistics. So, with everything that happened with Ali, I contacted all the bands to asked them to waive their fees for charity instead.

Ehlers-Danlos Support UK is the only one of its kind in the UK and its symbol is a zebra. Actually, Idealistics wrote and recorded a single called “Here comes the Zebras”. That song is fucking beautiful and it was that voice and that song that brought me to tears in the end. Everything`s going to charity and raising funds for this cause is fucking beautiful. Music is beginning to speak again against the government and all what’s going on with the country and I guess this is our way of speaking and giving the middle finger to the assholes on the streets and promoters thinking it’s nice to bully people as well to refuse them shows. We created a little chance for Ali and Idealistics to play and hopefully it creates more chances for them and makes other promoters listen.


Your plate is already full – but what are your plans
for 2020? What can we expect from North Central Music in the new year?

Sed Seddon:  Our energy will be going directly on the band we manage, Dirty Circus. Obviously the Underground event is also  100% growing and we are looking at new avenues to less unfamiliar territory but sticking with Northern & NCM ethos. Keeping things new and fresh, some things will stick, some things won’t – but that’s the biz I guess.

Famous last question: You describe yourself as a lover of all you can eat buffets. What would be on your dream buffet, or a dream rider?

Sed Seddon: Mate I don’t even care …just a plate, knife and fork in the middle of an all you can eat buffet and I’m gone for hours! That one on Deansgate is the bomb!

Event poster

A Northern Underground happens on 16th November 2019 in Liverpool:
https://www.facebook.com/events/724294691343894/

And on 17th November 2019 in Manchester
https://www.facebook.com/events/2446994828867804/

Tickets can be  purchased from the links below:

Liverpool
https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/whats-on/liverpool/the-jacaranda-club-liverpool/lc/2019-11-16/15:00/t-rdgjpj

Manchester
https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/whats-on/manchester/aatma/lc/2019-11-17/14:00/t-xxjyda

Additional reading:
https://www.rgm.press/a-northern-underground-weekender-musical-double-header-showcases-emerging-talent-across-manchester-liverpool/uncategorized/

You can follow Sed, North Central Music and A North Underground on the social media:

North Central Music:

https://www.facebook.com/northcentralmusic/
https://www.instagram.com/north_central_music/
https://twitter.com/NorthCentralMu1

A North Underground:

https://www.facebook.com/ANorthernUnderground/
https://twitter.com/ANorthernUnder1
https://www.instagram.com/anorthernunderground/

So grab your tickets my dears and lets meet in the underground. Once you know the secret about good music – you can forget the top 40 and enjoy the future.

We will see you in Liverpool or Manchester. Hit the North!

M/R

Indeterria meets Elly Bailey

Dear Readers,

Vanadian Avenue is on a mission to shed a light at the girls in the music indystry. We call it “The Girls Who Can” and we try to introduce you to the amazing women who makes things happen. They write, they book, they build stages, run lights, think of marketing campaings, sell tees and tickets at the doors. They are reps and managers, promoters, bookers and everything inbetween. Yet, despite doing a stellar job, having successful careers, they not always receive a fair share of attention and recognition. And we want to change that.

After speaking to Sahera Walker in May this year, we now had the pleasure to sit down with Elly Bailey, a photographer and journalist extraordinaire to discuss recent opportunities for women, her brand new photo-zine Why Generation? and photographic equipment. Please read on (and share) and Elly raised several  very important points in her interview and gives a sound advice to all young girls thinking of entering the business professionally.

Photographer, journalist, promoter and a writer – that’s a very impressive resume for a 22 year old. Please introduce yourself to the readers of Indieterria. Every career has to start somewhere.

Elly Bailey: Thank you! My name is Elly Bailey, I live in London. As you said, I am a photographer and journalist, mainly focusing on music. I write for sites such as The Zine, Gigslutz and This Feeling. I starting taking photos in 2016, originally shooting on film and then in 2018 I moved onto DSLR or digital photography.

 Tell us what inspired you to chose this particular career path? Was it a certain gig you attended or an album you listened to? Or maybe something completely different?

Elly Bailey: I attended the Academy of Contemporary Music, studying Music Business. ‘I think it was being surrounded by so many musicians and also attending so many of my friends gigs that made me want to start taking photos. I’ve always been very into documenting everything I do (I currently have over 29,000 photos on my phones camera roll!) and it was great to be able to document doing what I love best, e.g. attending gigs.

Elly at work

Music business is very male orientated but recently the tide is turning and women are getting noticed and praised for their contribution. There are also more opportunities for young females who want to enter the music business professionally. Last year you took part in the Music Venue Trust and PRS “Fightback Grassroots Promoter” for women. In your opinion, how important are schemes like this? Do they offer any real chance to learn the skills needed in this industry?

Elly Bailey: Taking part in the MVT and PRS venue fight back scheme was amazing as it gave young women the opportunity to put on their own live music event without having to worry about the money, as the scheme completely covered any costs, such as hiring the venue or equipment. I think schemes like this are incredibly important as they help to give young women the confidence boost they may need to take that first step into the music industry and also helps to give them hands on experience whilst making sure that they will be successful.

As a journalist you have worked for the popular GigSlutz website, The Zine and you run your own Youtube channel. If you could offer a piece of advice for girls who would like to follow in your footsteps, what would that be?

The cover of first issue of Why Generation zine

Elly Bailey: Websites such as Gigslutz, The Zine and many others are always looking for writers, so if you’re interested then just email away and ask! Taking that first step towards doing what you want to do can always seem incredibly daunting, but once you’ve done it, then that’s it, you’re on your way! Also everyone I’ve ever worked with have all been so lovely, which makes it so much easier to talk and network with people and find new work.

2019 is a ground breaking year. You have covered Wilkestock and Reading Festivals, interviewed The Sherlocks, False Heads, Sleaford Mods among others, reviewed high profile events such as This Feeling tours. What was the best gig you have seen so far?

Elly Bailey: This has definitely been a crazy year for me, so far I’ve somehow managing to attend 11 festivals, and still have more to go! I was feeling pretty low at the beginning of the year and also got pretty sick, so seeing FIDLAR at House Of Vans at the beginning on February was the perfect cheer up for me, seeing one of my favourite bands in such an intimate setting was the best. Festival wise, The Great Escape was so much fun, I discovered so many new bands that weekend. Also Download Festival was just non-stop laughter from beginning to end, the bands were amazing and the weather was horrendous and we had a sick time! And of course Truck Festival, my hometown festival, was a lovely weekend, surrounded by so many friends, I think we all really enjoyed it.

We need to ask about your new enterprise – a photo zine called Why Generation? You have teamed up with three other female journalists and photographers to create it. Tell us more about it. How did this idea come to be? Who are your co-workers? Is Why Generation a single issue release or are you planning to turn it into monthly/bimonthly magazine? Are you planning to keep it in this format or extend it to contain reviews and interviews in the future?

Why Generation editorial team

Elly Bailey: After I got home from Truck Festival, I went to an exhibition by Nan Goldin at the Tate Modern and saw that she started off making photo-books of her work and decided that I wanted to do something similar. I decided to stick with film photography to give the zine more of a niche and also felt that I have some great 35mm photos that I wanted to print. I contacted the other three photographers, slightly on a whim, and after the positive responses I got from them on the idea, I just jumped in head first and decided to just got for it!

When I first made the zine I wasn’t sure where it was going to go but I know now that I would like to do another issue with articles alongside the photos this time, and also potentially create my own website. After years of working for other people, it’s been great and also slightly scary to be completely in charge of what I’m doing, so who knows what will happen!

There is a launch party scheduled for 23rd of September to celebrate the release of Why Generation. Who is playing and what can we expect? Are tickets still available?

Why Generation? Event launch poster

Elly Bailey: Yes! It’s a free entry gig on 23rd September at The Monarch with three amazing bands playing: Ric, SPIT and Scary Lemons. Each are guaranteed to put on an amazing show. It’s definitely going to be something to liven up your Monday evening.

The famous last question – let’s imagine you can get your dream photography kit absolutely for free. What equipment is going into your shopping basket?

Elly Bailey: I do love my camera and have managed to get so many great photos out of it, but I will be the first to admit it’s nowhere near the best model on the market. With shooting gigs, you’re not allowed to use flash photography in bigger venues or at festivals, so you need a camera that lets in a lot of light, and annoyingly the best cameras for this are the more expensive ones, so one of those would definitely be going into my shopping basket.

Also a lens with a better zoom would be amazing, I’ve done a lot of standing on my tip-toes trying to get closer to the artist playing to make up for my lack of zoom.

You can follow Elly online:
https://www.facebook.com/EllyBaileyPhotography
https://www.instagram.com/elly_bailey_
https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000978271449

Buy copy of Why Generation? online:
https://www.ellybailey.com/product-page/why-generation-zine

Contact: ellybailey27@gmail.com​

Why Generation? Event:
Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/235155047375183/
Doors: 8 PM – 11:30 PM
Admission: Free Entry
Address:
The Monarch, 40-42 Chalk Farm Road, NW1 8BG London, United Kingdom

Stage times:
Ric – 8:30pm
SPIT – 9:15pm
Scary Lemons – 10:15pm

Big thank you’s to Elly for answering the questions and if you are attending the event tonight, please send us your pictures or videos. We will gladly update the entry with your snaps!

Support your scene and have fun!
Rita and Malicia

Indieterria meets The Gulps

Hello!

2019 seems to be the year of The Gulps. Whatever they do, they  do it perfectly, wherever they go, they win new fans. When they participate in an international competition, they easily win it, leaving their competition behind. And each of their tracks released so far is a real banger. If they continue on this stride, next year might see them  going right to the top. And frankly, this is what they deserve.

Lucky break has nothing to do with the results this London based quintet is receiving. They are one of the hardest working people we have met, and at the same time they are down to earth and  just genuinely nice. We sat down with The Gulps’ guitarist, Charlie Green to speak about the band, their influences and the new single entitled “Lola Cola”.

Official bio: 

Based in London and hailing from all different parts of Europe and the Middle East, The Gulps come together with a shared idealism for our times. Playfully reviving the original roots of rock and roll, they are a new wake up call and speak our truth, with enjoyment and optimism.

Lyrically informed poetry, sharing tales from our cities and experiences. With raw energy, The Gulps are a unique take on classic alternative pop, fuelled by the drive of rock music at its best.

The Gulps photographed by Jonathan Hallam.

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Indieterria. 

Charlie Green: The Gulps are a band of vivacious raconteurs who immigrated to London with a Mediterranean ferocity and an uncompromising skill for good music. We are a multi-various quintet who met at the intersection of smoke fuelled house parties and university, where the raw Gulp product was harnessed and the good times played.

Where are you based and who is in the band?

Charlie Green: We are a London based band hailing from different parts of Europe and The Middle East. Harry All is the lead singer, Charlie Green and Francesco Buffone are the guitarists, Simon Mouchard is on the bass and Raoul Khayat is the drummer.

Tell us something about the project – are there any goals that you managed to achieve to date?

Charlie Green: This has already been a huge year for the band, with the recording of the EP and touring. We secured a spot at Madrid’s Mad Cool Festival thanks to the votes of our fans and had the opportunity to play at the Truck Festival. We now have our sights on Space Mountain Festival in Granada and the recording of our first album.

What inspires you? What artists or genres had the biggest influence on you?

Charlie Green: Each of us bring our own biographical discography with us to influence the sound of The Gulps. Primarily, we draw upon the inspiration of rock’s household names such as The Strokes, Rolling Stones and The Clash to ground our compositions.

It`s all about the music – and we want to hear your tunes and how they have been written.

Charlie Green: You can hear all our tunes on Spotify, Soundcloud and watch our amazing videos directed by Sandra Crilo on Youtube. Also, we released the EP on vinyl earlier this year. Most of our songs start with an interesting riff or composition, then either Harry or me pen together the lyrics, based on what is stimulating us at the moment. After that, we take the new material to rehearsals and try it out with the whole band to test its potential.

The portrait of the band by Jonathan Hallam

Name your best song. What can you tell us about it?

Charlie Green: Our best song would be “The Kings House”. This song is about the old apartment where Harry and I used to live in London, on Camden Street. It’s where the magic happened, where we got into trouble with huge house parties and long smoky nights. It is a calling for freaks everywhere to celebrate their opulence, in a space opened to all.

How do you create your unique sound  and write the lyrics? What gear are you using?

Charlie Green:  We aim to write lyrically informed poetry, sharing tales from our cities and experiences. As for the equipment, we use different guitars and bass pedals, playing with distortions, delays, reverbs, to make our sound distinctive from others.

All in all, the marriage of guitars, Simon’s methodical bass, Raoul’s seamless drumming and Harry All’s energizing voice, allows us to celebrate our unique and youthful sound.

 

Are you touring? Where can we see you play live?

Charlie Green:  We have a number of shows lined up and you can catch us on:

Sunday 29th of September, Camden Assembly (London)
Friday 11th of October, Space Mountain Festival (Granada, Spain)
Saturday 2nd of November, Notting Hill Arts Club (London)
And from the 11th to the 15th of March 2020, The New Colossus Festival (New York)!

The Gulps at the pub by Xandru Zahra

Squad goals – where do you want to see the band in five years time?

Charlie Green:  This is a good question! We want to be touring around the world and playing big festivals such as Glastonbury, Coachella, Reading etc. We also want to go to studios to record new music and make The Gulps a new religion.

If any bookers or promoters want to get in touch – what is the best way to contact you?

Charlie Green:  They can contact us via email at thegulps.london@gmail.com, or just send us a message on one of our social media pages, they are listed below.

Imagine you can record an album with any producer, dead or alive in a studio of your choice. Who would be on your record?

Charlie Green:  We would love to work with the legendary George Martin, or Phil Spector (Beatles producers) but we are extremely happy working with ‘’Youth’’ at the moment. ‘’Youth’’ is a genuine producer with a long CV to his name, giving his soul and life to the music.

You can follow The Gulps at the socials:

https://www.thegulps.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thegulps/
https://www.instagram.com/thegulps/
https://twitter.com/TGulps
https://soundcloud.com/user-209918800
https://amazingtunes.com/thegulps/activity?page=2
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiL-v5G2Hnpgyb0it9E6mFw
https://thegulps.bandcamp.com/

Or listen to them on Spotify:

 

 

 

Indieterria meets Bexatron

Dear Readers,

They are one of London`s best kept secrets, a band that took classic rock influences and dragged them into XXI century. Holding to their DIY ethos with pride, their amps turned up to 11 and writing songs that will make you shake your booty – Bexatron offer you a whole package of rock and roll fun.  You will not regret this ride. Get on! We sat down with Greg Radcliffe to speak about their beginning, gruelling recording sessions and touring Canada.

 

Band logo

Your bio introduces you as “an octane pop punk with a glam coat” from the heart of London. What an intriguing way to describe a band! Please tell our readers who is in Bexatron and how did the group start?

Greg Radcliffe:  Bexatron consists of BeXXX on vocals, Belle Star on drums, Adam Adorjan on bass and me on guitar. I had been for looking for a singer to front a band which eventually became Bexatron for months. I bumped into BeXXX in Bruno’s Cafe in Soho in London.

I thought she looked the business and asked if she could sing. She said yes. The rest is history. I knew the boys already so when they heard her sing, they jumped in.

 The band has been compared to rock greatest (Blondie, Joan Jett, The Pretenders) and lauded for bringing uncompromising rock with a charismatic female leader back to the frontlines. God knows we missed it.  Do you see yourselves as saviours of rock from repetitiveness and mediocrity?

Greg Radcliffe:  We’re not saviours. We are more pioneers of a genre of music that we like. Putting our own slant on it. We are constantly avoiding repetitiveness and mediocrity. I would say 75% of what we do ends up on the cutting room floor.

Bexatron live – photography by Tosh Marshall
https://www.facebook.com/ToshMarshallPhotography/

 Bexatron has released their debut album “Hey You” in December 2018 and a stand-alone single “Dirty Disco”. One of the things being mentioned in every review is how the records brings generations of guitar music fans together. It`s like you found a secret formula between classic rock antics while sounding fresh and appealing for young audience. What`s your secret?

Greg Radcliffe: There’s no secret (laughs) You hit the nail on the head. All the aforementioned artists, we have been disciples of. We are just spreading the word through our own interpretations. I guess that what keeps it fresh.

 In an interview for Vents Magazine you described the recording sessions as demanding and not without difficulties. Tell us where “Hey You!” was created and how do you manage to face gruelling recordings with such energy and positivity? 

Greg Radcliffe: “Hey You!” was created in Soho, Kilburn, Hackney, Barcelona. The recording was gruelling but we thought to stick to our guns and make the record ‘WE’ wanted. It could have easily ended up on X Factor. Underneath the songs are basically pop songs. However, we didn’t want that one-minute wonder sound. We’re here to stay.

You are now back with a new single “I`m Trash” – an angry track directed at the modern life and how powers that be can make us feel small and insignificant.  Where did the inspiration for the track come from?

Greg Radcliffe:  We wouldn’t say “I`m Trash” is an angry song. It’s reflective of, as you mentioned, modern day life and the society we live. The song like the whole album is pretty much based around London past and present.

Bexatron live shows are legendary – audience dancing, singing lyrics back at the band (in a slightly off-key manner) and generally having good fun. You just recently smashed it at Camden Rocks. How was it to play a home coming gig?

Greg Radcliffe: Camden is our spiritual home. It`s always nice to play to a packed Camden Assembly at 2 pm on the hottest day of the year.

The band is soon off to play your first tour of Canada. It seems like a natural step considering the amount of radio airplay you received there. What can your overseas fans expect from your shows?

Greg Radcliffe:  I think our audience in Canada expect to see the fourth dimension. So far, they have heard it from their radios or phones and seen it on TV screens. Now they are going to get the real deal up close.

Bexx in her element – photography by Tosh Marshall
https://www.facebook.com/ToshMarshallPhotography/

Talking about support from radio stations. Amazing Radio has been championing you a lot these days.  So does BBC Introducing. Do you have any DJs that were instrumental for your career that you would like to give a shout out to?

Greg Radcliffe: All’s been pretty grass roots radio wise. We need to mention Spizz on Resonance Radio, Peter Fox on Foxy Radio, Dave Renegade on Dark Hearts of Camden Radio, Gwen Ever on Deal Radio and Stuart Clack on The Premium Blend Radio. There’s many more, but the reason we’ve given them a shout is that they have all been to our gigs, not just spun our tune.

When all the touring obligations are completed, and you have some time for yourselves – do you plan to take longer holidays or rather just bury yourself in the studio again?

Greg Radcliffe: No holidays, we will just keep on promoting “Hey You!” through till festival time 2020. You can expect our next offering in October 2020. As we’ve already said 75% of our stuff ends up on the cutting room floor, but we’ve already got a fair whack done and start shaping it up when we get back.

Last (in)famous question – imagine that you can play any legendary venue in the world for your most dedicated fans. Where do you take them?

Greg Radcliffe:  Hammersmith Odeon in London.
Bexxx:  CBGBS in New York.
Adam Adorjan: Madison Square Garden in New York.
Belle Star: The Rounhouse in London.

The band live on stage – photography by Graham Hearn https://www.facebook.com/graham.hearn.9

You can follow the band on socials:

https://www.bexatronuk.com/
https://www.facebook.com/bexatronlive/
https://twitter.com/_BEXATRON
https://www.instagram.com/bexatron_ukofficial/
https://soundcloud.com/bexatron_london
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvDY-TyjsmRspVwYDI74MSg
https://open.spotify.com/artist/2vKP9JrDVQyfNroiqCdAkk?si=w_I3B9K_SMepx-vjmC4zAA

Big thank you to Greg Radclife for agreeing to this interview and to Mimi Brock-Stark of Lander PR for making necessary arrangements.

Shall we meet again on the blog for more kick ass music talk? You bet.

M/R

Indieterria Review – “Red Hot Military Audition” by The Garage Flowers

Dear Readers,

They have been described as “explosive, dark and sexy” but that would be an understatement. The Garage Flowers are the most riotous, creative and bold four piece that London has seen since The Manics` infamous stay in the capital. In the era of safe pop music and forgettable starlets, The Garage Flowers have all qualities of proper rock stars: swagger, nonchalance, determination, perseverance and real, raw talent. On the record or on stage the band will hypnotise you, will grab your attention before you can blink and will leave you being absolutely, hopelessly in love with them. Had it been 1970`s The Garage Flowers would be Gods. Or maybe they were and now returned to show all the lads in parkas in the North how to do rock and roll properly.

The Garage Flowers in bloom. Photo by Sophie McCarthy https://www.facebook.com/sofielaurenmccarthy

2019 has already been very busy for the band. They have released acoustic version of their older single “Miss Maggie May” and premiered a proper belter “Panic Street Again”. They toured both internationally and on domestic front. Now they return with “Red Hot Military Audition” – their new single. On the cover you can see The Garage Flowers dressed in military attire that make one think of Manic Street Preachers (in the Holy Bible period) or The Clash. And we have to give it to the band  – they know exactly what they are doing. “Red Hot Military Audition” has the punk attitude of The Clash, with energy of Guns n Roses and melody line that James Dean Bradfield would love to claim as his own. There are even samples – something that Manics practised a lot on The Holy Bible. And yet, the song does not feel like a mash up of influences. It doesn’t feel dated either. It`s fresh, modern day indie record that you have on repeat and will sing to yourself without even realising it. Oh NME where are you in your large print format? We need your pages at the newsagents every week so bands like The Garage Flowers can look at us from every stand and remind us that rock and roll is still alive and kicking.

Give The Garage Flowers a year or two and you will see them on SXSW and touring large venues.

We have been lucky enough to be able to sit down with  Joe Capaldi – the voice and front man of the band and ask him few questions regarding the new single. You have no idea how busy and in demand those guys are!

Its only rock and roll but we like it! Photo by Eric Mouroux https://www.facebook.com/eric.mouroux

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Indieterria.  Where are you based and who is in the band?

Joe Capaldi:  The Garage Flowers are

Joe Capaldi on vocals/guitar from Kings Cross, London
Mike Serapinas on bass/backing vocals from Chiswick, London
Jonny Webber on guitar/backing vocals from Finsbury Park, London
Norea Persson on drums/backing vocals from Bethnal Green, London

Tell us something about the project – are there any goals that you managed to achieve?

Joe Capaldi: Our goal is as it always was:  to have a documentary made about us and have it narrated by Alan Clayson.

What inspires you? What artist or genre had the biggest influence on you?

Joe Capaldi:  In college I’d wear cardigans (whatever the weather) and keep a bottle of red wine with me all the time. Taking swigs from it when the teacher would leave the room to get much needed attention. I also started messing my hair up consciously – with hair gum (before I wisened to hairspray) to look more like my obsession at the time – Bob Dylan. I loved the whole myth of him. Would religiously listen to his music, watch the few interviews that were on YouTube and screen “No Direction Home” endlessly.

The sleeve to Red Hot Military Audition single

It’s all about the music – and we want to hear about your new single. Is there a story behind the song, where and how was it written.

Joe Capaldi:  I put together the riff before the band was even formed, and played it for Jonny one of the first times we ever met up. It was a lot faster then and had no singing. I always loved the title but everyone used to loathe it, I eventually won them over though, or just tired them with my stubborn way.

Are you touring? Where can we see you playing live?

Joe Capaldi:  We’ve actually got some very exciting dates we’re finalising now. I’m not yet allowed to announce them though. “All apologies”  as Kurdt Kobain said in 1993.

If any bookers or promoters want to get in touch – what is the best way to contact you?

Joe Capaldi:  You can contact us directly through our email address – thegarageflowers@outlook.com

Imagine you can record an album with any artist, dead or alive in a studio of your choice. Who would be on your record?

Joe Capaldi:  Ooooh great question! For me I’d say Tom Waits, at the moment I’m into putting instruments together that don’t normally go together, and creating atmosphere as well as great songs. I think he’d be great for painting a dark, demented atmosphere. VIVA WAITS.

Future looks bright. Photo by Elly Bailey https://www.facebook.com/EllyBaileyPhotography/

You can follow The Garage Flowers on social media at:

https://www.thegarageflowers.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/thegarageflowersband/
https://twitter.com/garageflowerss
https://www.instagram.com/the_garage_flowers/
https://soundcloud.com/thegarageflowers
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLTq_hTLgIq9HqMO78PkRng
https://open.spotify.com/artist/0GaTRMQodNVTRtNblmPIQW?si=c8GjOaFNScaFnjydYBRsfQ

We will update this blog in few days as there will be a video coming and we want to show you what the band has prepared! And obviously there will be tour dates to announce so please watch this space!

R/M

Indieterria meets Sahera Walker

Sahera Walker interview

Known as the Queen of Underground Scene in London, Sahera Walker is one of the most respected independent promoters working on the DIY scene. Her passion, music knowledge and intuition have been praised on numerous occasions and were recognized by industry professionals. Indieterria is following young, successful females who are taking the music business by storm and continue to change the industry rules. We have sat down with Sahera to discuss her zine, modern alternative music and her ambitious plans to turn Cafe 1001 into a hub of music, fashion and counter-culture.

Sahera Walker

Bio: Sahera is 20 year old music journalist based in East London, and she is the creative-owner of Indie Underground Blog

She started blogging in 2016, which is when she first set up her blogging site. She has since gone on to work in PR & live music, and now owns Some Might Say Magazine, and is the lead booker for live music events at Café 1001 on Brick Lane. She runs gigs for her magazine at Nambucca in Islington & The Five Bells in New Cross.

Indie Underground & Some Might Say have received support from BBC Radio 6, Flying Vinyl, Clue Records, This Feeling, The Truman Brewery, The Zine UK, Clash Magazine, 1234 Records, Roadkill Records, ArtBeats Promo, Coda Agency, Devil PR, and more. The digital and physical platforms Sahera runs all have one aim; to promote underground DIY music, and support creatives within the industry by printing, reviewing, and featuring their work. Always keen to work with new artists, Indie Underground is a growing platform which has gained an impeccable reputation for scouting new acts who go on to be huge within the indie industry

Sahera also works as a freelance photographer & journalist, focusing solely on DIY indie rock, psych rock, grunge, and post punk music

Promoter, PR professional, zine editor, writer, journalist – it’s hard to believe that one person can do it all. Who is Sahera Walker? Please introduce yourself to the readers of our blog.

Some Might Say zine promotional picture

Sahera Walker: Very kind of you! So my name is Sahera, I’m 20 years old, and I’m a music journalist and promoter based in East London. I’m the creative owner and editor of Some Might Say Zine and Indie Underground Blog, running launch parties for each zine that comes out. I have recently taken over the Live Bookings and PR for a new DIY space on Brick Lane too!

You created “Some Might Say” zine at the age of 18. Was there any specific reason why you decided to start a musical magazine?

Sahera Walker:  I really love the DIY authenticity of rock music, and to me there’s something really special about flicking through a physical print publication, and just seeing all the beautiful photos and art pieces in print, and soaking up new musical knowledge. I really love that vibe, and I wanted to bring that authenticity back into an industry where mainstream magazines are either dying out, or turning to conventional pop music instead. I used to love NME but they sold themselves out years ago, so I suppose I wanted to create my own print publication with no sponsors or external funding, its sole aim to promote fresh upcoming new music.

So far “Some Might Say” published five issues and the sixth one will be released shortly. What can we find in the newest edition?

Sahera Walker: It will be available to purchase by the end of May/ very start of June, via somemightsay.org. This Issue has taken months to work on, as it’s taking Some Might Say down a slightly more creative and unconventional route, so I hope the wait will be worth it!

Alongside with the zine, you run a popular music blog Indie Underground focusing on rock, post punk and DIY scene. In your opinion, how important is support from blogs and magazines for up and coming artists?

Sahera Walker: To me, it’s absolutely vital. The music industry is made into the thriving and vibrant scene that it is through DIY support, from people who love music and want to work, often for free, to promote and support new music. That’s where fans of bands end up becoming journalists, photographers, promoters, and bloggers, inspiring a real love and passion into their work. This supportive DIY scene is probably the most important thing for new bands, as without them who is going to fuel the underground music scene?

Several issues of Some Might Say magazine

You have put bands such as Yonaka, Calva Louise, False Heads or most recently Black Midi on many people’s radars. What captures your attention when it comes to indie bands? How do you recognize the “next big thing”?

Sahera Walker:  I do try! I think I was very lucky, when I got into music aged about 17 it was when bands like Yonaka, The Blinders, Strange Bones, Calva Louise, and False Heads were all starting out (the last three I’ve had play Some Might Say gigs for me, which I’m very proud of!), so I just naturally saw them at small venues playing to tiny handfuls of people. For me, I like unconventional bands that are passionate and exciting, and it just has to click in a special way for me to go crazy about a band. This doesn’t happen too often, as it’s more of a feeling you get from certain bands – it’s very special though, and all the bands you mentioned are ones who really gripped and excited me when I discovered them.

Gig goers often ask what they can do to help bands, something beyond buying a tee from the merch store. Would you have any suggestions?

Sahera Walker: I think going to gigs is the most important thing, as it supports not only the bands, but also the small venues and promoters who are hosting the gigs, which is fundamental to the scene as a whole. Bands that have a strong live following as well are the ones who end up being hotly tipped by journalists, on the radio, and then eventually scouted by agents and managers, so going to gigs really helps. But even the small things like social media posts, buying merch, streaming and downloading music; it all helps, and I know they mean massive amounts to the bands.

In April 2019, you joined Cafe 1001 as their official promoter and PR. Tell us more about this place. What can it offer to the emerging bands?

Sahera Walker: So Café 1001 is a venue space in Shoreditch, just opposite Rough Trade East. We are currently undergoing a really exciting refurbishment and rebrand in the venue, which will change the name and appearance into something a lot more DIY. We’re taking the venue down a more creative, subculture-philosophy inspired route, and alongside the gigs (focusing on indie/punk/grime/grunge) we want to have a lot of new DJs playing with us too. What we’re offering bands is payed gigs, in a fantastic DIY 200 capacity space, with a state of the arts PA and backline system. I also run PR campaigns and social media campaigns for my live events, so bands would be fully supported by us.

Some Might Say logo at legendary London Club, Nambucca

You are known for coming up with groundbreaking ideas. Your newest one is to create a rotating exhibition aimed at avant-garde DIY artists, music zine makers, live music photographers and designers. Can you provide us with more information about it? How long will it last? will artists be able to sell their works?

Sahera Walker:  Given the DIY subculture philosophy we are implementing, I came up with the idea of running a rotating exhibition in the venue’s front room. We will have art work, photos (art based, film, portrait, and live music), and film reels on display, as well as zines in the venue. The idea is to have a launch night (June 27th) with live music to accompany, and this will be a chance for the creatives involved to network and sell their work. We will then keep some of the work up in the venue, and keep the zines in the café space for people to browse through during the day. Then every three months, we will run another exhibition, where we can refresh the art and photos we have, and bring in some new zines to the space

Let’s play! You are given a whole page in The Guardian for a music column. What bands are you recommending to the public?

Sahera Walker: So many, I could write you pages on this! I’d have to narrow it down to Black Country New Road, The Murder Capital, Weird Milk, Kid Kapichi, Fontaines DC, Uncle Tesco, Legss, Happy Hour, Pip Blom, False Heads, Squid, Haze, LICE, Avalanche Party, Strange Bones, Calva Louise and JW Paris. Just a quick note, when I spoke earlier about those rare special bands who I just click with – Kid Kapichi are my current obsession, and I would recommend them highly.

The last question (but very important one). If any artist or musician wants to get in touch – how can they reach you?

Sahera Walker: I have contact forms on my websites which are usually the best shout to play a gig at my new venue:
https://indieunderground.blog/play-for-us/,

Send your submissions to:
https://indieunderground.blog/contact/
https://somemightsay.org/contact/

Or any London based bands, you can usually find me at a scatty punk gig in Camden or Brixton, so feel free to come up and say hi!

You can follow Sahera on socials:
https://www.facebook.com/sahera.walker/
https://www.instagram.com/youareallslaves/
https://twitter.com/sahera_walker
https://open.spotify.com/user/1143822162
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCssXbu_GT0ZU47I8xUmXEdw

https://www.instagram.com/somemightsayzine/
https://somemightsay.org/
https://www.facebook.com/somemightsayzine/

https://indieunderground.blog/
https://www.facebook.com/indieundergroundblog/

Articles:
http://northern-exposure.co/interview-sahera-walker-some-might-say/
https://www.thezineuk.co.uk/2019-futurepicks-the-music-people-on-and-off-stage/

The new issue of “Some Might Say” will land in a couple of days so don’t forget to order your copy. Supporting local zines, magazines and independent artists is vital for the scene to survive. Indieterria will keep shining light at the people behind the music – promoters, event managers, club owners, streaming services companies, radio DJ’s and hosts, photographers, managers or music scouts – they all are working in the background helping artists move from one level of their careers to another. They are essential yet they are rarely getting any credits or thanks. Let’s bring them into limelight!

Please stay tuned as we have something special planned very soon!

XXX
R+M