Indieterria review – “Chains” by Lower Loveday

Dear Readers,

It`s always such a pleasure to review a kick ass single. Nothing makes an A&R happier than new music. But a kick ass single coming  from a band that we adore here at Vanadian Avenue is even better.  We have such a soft spot for Lower Loveday. We met them for the first time in February 2018 when the band performed a blinding set at Birmingham O2 Arena during the final of SoundWaves Music Competition. They did not win but being placed in the final five was still a great result.

Since that night at O2 Academy – we have been big fans of this West Midlands quarter. We have interview them on our blog twice (HERE & HERE), they played for our first showcase in London at legendary Nambucca, we ventured together to Salford to watch Freeda and Kashmere play and generally plotted for musical world domination from our corner in the Middle Earth.

Lower Loveday received backing from BBC Hereford and Worcester and BBC Introducing West Midlands

It is a privilege to watch a band develop and reach new heights. And believe us in the past two years Lower Loveday have had many accomplishments. They supported Only The Poets, APRE and Rory Wynne, received national airplay on BBC 6 Music (from Tom Robinson nonetheless), their music has been used by ITV (on Good Morning Britain) and have been championed by both BBC Introducing Hereford and Worcester and BBC West Midlands.

If that is not enough for ya, then add this to the mix. Their newest single “Chains” was produced by famous Sugar House in their studio in St. Helens (Merseyside).

Sugar House consist of a freelance engineering and producing duo – Lee McCarthy and Ady Hall.  Having worked with artists such as Pale Waves, Viola Beach, Mint, Glass Caves, The Empty Page or Larkins, they have built a solid reputation on the indie circuit. They contributed towards songs that  made it to the national playlists on Radio 1, BBC 6 and X Radio and some of them went into Top 40.

Digital sleeve for Chains single

“Chains” is another banger that Sugar House mastered and if the demo of the song was picked up by ITV, then the finished product will be welcomed with open arms at BBC Radio 1 in no time. It is a power pop indie, with dazzling guitar hooks and strong rhythm section. It is almost impossible to resist dancing to the song. We have seen it first hand on live gigs and it is perfect for jumping around while holding hands with other fans. But it will also be a favourite of every kitchen disco around the country.

While musical side of the song remains upbeat, there is a dark undercurrent showing itself in the lyrics. “Chains” tells a story of a man pondering his future in a world that is far from welcoming.

Says the band:  “The song was written from the point of view of a young man, reaching adulthood and deciding what to do with his life. Having had so much fun throughout his university years, the real world doesn’t seem as good as it is made out to be. The punchy beats and thunderous nature of the song, provide the perfect backdrop for the big, melodic chorus of a man calling out for help”.

“Chains” is a second single released by Lower Loveday in 2019 and follows up its older sister “The Fire That Burns Inside”.  It was released  digitally on all streaming platforms on August 30.

You can listen to the song here:


Follow Lower Loveday on the socials:

https://www.lowerloveday.com/
https://www.instagram.com/lowerloveday/
https://twitter.com/lower_loveday
https://soundcloud.com/lowerloveday
https://www.facebook.com/lowerloveday
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClGDR9XIPOo96KRox090yTg
https://open.spotify.com/artist/32uwvjulWxUc90gc7bPXMz?si=Gs6qIX_BQfeiVkQmtJUBBw

 

And you can give kudos to Sugar House at:

https://www.sugarhousemusic.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/sugarhousemusic/
https://twitter.com/SugarHouseUK
https://www.instagram.com/sugarhouseuk/
https://soundcloud.com/sugarhousemusic

Local press responded to the single in a most amazing way – an interview with the band has been published in Worcester News, Hereford Times, Malvern Gazette and Droitwich Advertiser. Please see the galleries below:

 

Press articles:
https://www.malverngazette.co.uk/news/regional/17872448.lower-loveday-rise-jodie-hughes-39-focus-local-music-scene
https://www.worcesternews.co.uk/news/17872448.lower-loveday-rise-jodie-hughes-39-focus-local-music-scene/
https://www.herefordtimes.com/news/regional/17872448.lower-loveday-rise-jodie-hughes-39-focus-local-music-scene/
https://www.droitwichadvertiser.co.uk/news/worcester_news/17872448.lower-loveday-rise-jodie-hughes-39-focus-local-music-scene/

PDF files can be find:
https://cocamidemea.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/worcester-news_31.08.2019_page-23.pdf
https://cocamidemea.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/worcester-news_31.08.2019_page-25.pdf

Independent press was also up to the task and the band received a strong coverage from music blogs and online magazines:

 

Articles:
https://www.xsnoize.com/track-premiere-indie-pop-4-piece-lower-loveday-return-with-chains/
http://www.alternativeaddiction.com/AANewsArticle/aa-indie-song-of-the-day-lower-loveday2
https://www.bornmusiconline.com/premiere-lower-loveday-chains/
https://wordsformusic.blog/2019/08/31/lower-loveday-chains-new-music/
http://indiemidlands.com/lower-loveday-chains/

See you soon,
xoxo
Rita and Malicia

Indieterria Review – “97/91” by The Battery Farm

Dear Readers,

If you spent more than five minutes on social media in the last two years, chances are that you have seen this viral quote on how David Bowie kept the universe together. The Starman`s gone and everything is coming apart at the seams.

Band`s logo

It`s hard to deny that we are going through some very dark days and finding hope may seem like an impossible task. But we believe that there is a force out there that is much stronger than bombs, violence or any orange impostor (or his blond counterpart) in office. That force is art/music and we have plenty of incredible artists among us who do an excellent job at repairing the fabric of universe and keeping us all sane.

The beauty of art is that anyone can make it and you don`t have to have top 40 albums to contribute significantly to the eternal quest of balancing cosmic powers.

We want you to meet a brand new band that we recently discovered, who are incredibly apt at channelling the internal anxiety felt nowadays and providing sonic catharsis to listeners. They are called The Battery Farm and come from our favourite place on Earth – Manchester.  Their debut single “97/91” is a powerful anthem of thundering drums, heavy guitars and haunted vocals.  It fits perfectly in the new emerging genre of post punk revival, mixing semi spoken vocals with musical fury. The song will prove ideal both in the mosh pit or in the gym and fans of Idles, Bambara, Sons and Avalanche Party should pay closer attention.

But there is more to The Battery Farm than soundtracking the moment. Its the way they speak in the interviews, how they respect and champion other artists, their ethics. We sat down with their lead singer Benjamin Corry for an interview and the first thing he tells us is that kindness is magic.  Among all the new bands that blow their own trumpet and proclaim that they are new Oasis, how absolutely amazing is to hear that there are artists who have a different approach to life.

This is our entire conversation with The Battery Farm. Worth reading. Every. Single. Word.

Please introduce yourself to the readers of Indieterria.  Where are you based and who is in the band?

Benjamin Corry:  Hello! We are The Battery Farm, a doom punk band from Manchester playing vicious, guttural punk music pulsating with rawness, honesty, pain and passion. We are Ben Corry (vocals/guitar), Dominic Corry (guitar), Paul Worrall (bass) and Sam Parkinson (drums)

Tell us something about the project – are there any goals that you managed to achieve?

Benjamin Corry:  Me and Dom formed the band on the back of our old band breaking up. The whole mentality since we started has been to put everything together piece-by-piece and just see how far we can get. So with that in mind just managing to get the band together has felt like an achievement. The idea for The Battery Farm only came about towards the end of last year, but actually getting to the point of being able to have a functioning band feels like an achievement. That sounds well trite but it’s true. We played our first gig a couple of weeks ago, released our debut single on 15th June and played our first festival on 6th July (R-Fest in Manchester). That’s the kind of start I wanted for us and so that’s an achievement in itself. Things have started with a bang and looking at what we’ve got coming up it’s only going to get better.

Benjamin Corry photographed by Richard McCann
https://www.facebook.com/richard.mccann.739

What inspires you? What artist or genre had the biggest influence on you?

Benjamin Corry:  Our lives and the world we live in inspire us and drive our sound and our words. The songs me and Dom write are borne – both musically and lyrically – out of the sense of desperation we felt at the end of last year, when we’d just about had enough of everything. These songs are an aural lashing out at ourselves, at the rest of the world, at the human race, at politicians, at the sense of life closing in around us. Passion and fear and anger and joy and desire for something better are things that inspire us. Human stuff. In terms of artists we admire, bands like Idles, Evil Blizzard, Radiohead, Witch Fever, Nirvana and Sleaford Mods bleed into our sound. Idles in particular are doing something remarkable at the moment; I think they’re the most important band in the world. Their music is violent and frantic and pulverising but at the same time is laced with the most beautiful empathy and compassion. I think the world needs more of that. Kindness is magic.

Its all about the music – and we want to hear about your new single. Is there a story behind the song, where and how was it written?

Benjamin Corry:  “97/91” was actually written a couple of years ago. I stumbled upon an article about the murder of Suzanne Capper in the early 90s and the moral panic about it in the newspapers at the time. The article went into excruciating detail about what happened which stayed with me for months afterwards. One of the big factors in the story affecting me in the way it did was the fact that it happened in Moston, north Manchester, which is where I grew up. It sort of brought a horrific sense of reality to the whole thing – I know the street it happened on, I’ve walked past the houses, I’ve grown up with the area being a big part of my life. And it still informs a lot of my writing. To be able to envision it all so clearly made it all the more horrendous. That got me to thinking about why I reacted much more viscerally to this particular instance than I would have to the miserable horrors that go on across the world daily. The answer was because I’m familiar with the setting. It only felt real because I could see it. That is what “97/91” is about – that murder is a jumping-off point to explore the cognitive dissonance that is ingrained into people across the world that allows us to be passive in the face of the mass, grotesque violence going on in far-flung places every day. It’s a frightening, dystopian aspect of the human condition and it’s not generally something we’re aware we’re doing. I guess that’s the worst part. The song is a flailing at the worst things people are capable of. The world can be a fucking horror show, “97/91” is essentially a desperate scream in the face of it.

Are you touring? Where can we see you playing live?

Benjamin Corry:  We’re at Night & Day Café in Manchester on 2nd August, then it’s our first out of town gig at Sound in Liverpool on 28th September for Low Flying Records’ Musicians Against Homelessness weekender. Low Flying have basically put together a huge MAH Festival across Merseyside. We’re on the Saturday and we can’t wait. After that we’re playing at Whittles in Oldham on 24th October. We have a couple more really good ones to announce but we’re not at liberty to discuss them just yet.

If any bookers or promoters want to get in touch – what is the best way to contact you?

Benjamin Corry: E-mail us at batteryfarmband@gmail.com, or we’re on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as @hebatteryfarm

Imagine you can record an album with any artist, dead or alive in a studio of your choice. Who would be on your record?

Benjamin Corry: Elvis. Every time. I’m fascinated by him. That voice, that face, those eyes, that sheer, raw, uncontrollable presence and charisma. It’d be incredible to see what he could do with our songs and our sound. I doubt he’d like us to be honest, but this is my fantasy and in this universe Elvis bloody loves the punk rock.

The Battery Farm in their rehearsal room

You can follow The Battery Farm on social media:

https://www.facebook.com/thebatteryfarm/
https://twitter.com/TheBatteryFarm
https://www.instagram.com/thebatteryfarm/
https://thebatteryfarm.bandcamp.com/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChp93XaDBuXnmYQY-o2bhFg
https://open.spotify.com/artist/6qWGopTzUjeSYmsXyQ8RIr?si=DfhOPdjFRgugNDIkLVLuAA

That’s it. Here`s another band to add to our “Must See Bucket List”. And if you have a chance to catch them live – do so. With artists like The Battery Farm we are more than optimistic about the future of music, and even the universe.

M/R